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Archive for the ‘Gifted Education Day’ Category

Today we were fortunate to have M. René Islas, Executive Director of the National Association of Gifted Children, here to testify before the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee. His remarks are attached: Gifted Education Day remarks from NAGC.

Joining him was Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruction, Gayle Pauley, and 2017 State Teacher of the Year, Camille Jones. You can view their testimony through the TVW Archive here.

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Governor Inslee has declared February 2, 2017, Gifted Education Day. We encourage you to remind your legislators that gifted education is basic education, and share with them what highly capable services mean to your family. Use the District Finder on the Legislature’s website, or call the Legislative hotline at 1-800-562-6000.

gifted-education-day-in-washington-2017

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We have an exciting day of advocacy scheduled for Thursday, February 2nd.

Our program begins at 10am in the Columbia Room.

Our morning events will include Gayle Pauley, Assistant Superintendent for Special Programs and Federal Accountability, and Jody Hess, Highly Capable Program Supervisor from OSPI, to talk about the amazing collaborations going on right now to bring groundbreaking professional development opportunities to educators across the state. Their work will have immediate impacts on the way highly capable learners are identified.

We’ll also hear from Camille Jones, Washington State’s 2017 Teacher of the Year, about the highly capable students she teaches in the Quincy School District, students who have historically been underrepresented in gifted programs.

Rounding off our featured speakers is René Islas, Executive Director of the National Association of Gifted Children. NAGC has recently launched a Giftedness Knows No Boundaries campaign that is a perfect match with our work in Washington State.

We expect many attendees will have capitol tours or meetings scheduled with legislators. We will leave ample time between our morning and afternoon events for you to explore and advocate.

At 1:30pm, action will move to the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee where there will be a work session on highly capable. We expect our portion of the hearing to begin at about 2pm. Pauley, Jones, and Islas will have 30 minutes to inform and answer questions from the members of the Committee to help them better understand the needs of highly capable learners.

Reminder: parking is limited on the campus so consider parking in one of the satellite lots and using DASH.  Parking on both the campus and satellites can be expensive so come prepared. If you use DASH, there is a convenient stop right outside the door nearest the Columbia Room.

Can’t join us in Olympia on February 2nd?

The Washington State Constitution states: “It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders.” It also requires that the system be uniform across the state and funded through regular and dependable sources. in 2007 The McCleary lawsuit was brought forward against the state for its failure to fulfill its paramount duty, and the State Supreme Court ruled in 2012 in favor of the plaintiffs, finding that the state was not meeting its educational obligation to the more than 1 million public school children in Washington.

A central issue in the court’s McCleary decision is the unconstitutional reliance on local levies, which are neither regular nor dependable, to fund basic education. As advocates for the highly capable students of Washington, we are working for full funding of the Highly Capable Program. The Legislature must pass a plan by the end of this session to comply with the State Supreme Court’s order.

Senate Republicans have offered one plan, SB 5607. House Democrats have just released their plan, HB 1843. Our initial readings of each plan finds that each falls short of ample funding for highly capable services. Each relies on an old, insufficient, and somewhat arbitrary formula for establishing eligibility for highly capable funding. We recommend the state follow the recommendations of the 2010 Highly Capable Program Technical Work Group and fund highly capable services for 5% of a district’s enrolled population, an amount close to historical levels of students served in Washington, and one that aligns with the recommendations of the National Association for Gifted Children.

If you can’t join us in Olympia for Gifted Education Day, contact your legislators by letter, phone — the hot line is 1.800.562.6000 — or email on or about February 2nd and urge them to fund highly capable services at 5% of enrollment.

Share your personal experience as a parent or your child’s experience. Your personal story on the impact of funding inequities is a powerful way to highlight the need for a solution.

To find and contact your Legislators, use the District Finder on the Legislature’s website.

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Governor Inslee has declared January 29th, 2016 Gifted Education Day. We encourage you to remind your legislators that gifted education is basic education, and share with them what highly capable services mean to your family. Use the District Finder on the Legislature’s website, or call the Legislative hotline at 1-800-562-6000.

proclamation 2016

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We have a full program scheduled for Friday, January 29.

Program begins at 9am or as close to it as we can manage. Please help us by being on time.

Deb Merle, Governor Inslee’s chief education advisor; Jody Hess from the Highly Capable Program (HCP) office at the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI); and Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn are scheduled as speakers and will be open to questions from the floor.

Supt. Dorn will be the recipient of a Certificate of Appreciation for being the only state official who has proposed substantial increases in HCP funding and accepts the findings of the Highly Capable Program Technical Working Group. He has a very tight schedule on Friday so please try to be on time. He is scheduled to speak at 9:15.

Reminder: parking is limited on the campus so consider parking in one of the satellite lots and using DASH.  Parking on both the campus and satellites can be expensive so come prepared. If you use DASH, there is a convenient stop right outside the door nearest the Columbia Room.

Can’t join us in Olympia on January 29th?

The Washington State Constitution states: “It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders.” It also requires that the system be uniform across the state and funded through regular and dependable sources. in 2007 The McCleary lawsuit was brought forward against the state for its failure to fulfill its paramount duty, and the State Supreme Court ruled in 2012 in favor of the plaintiffs, finding that the state was not meeting its educational obligation to the more than 1 million public school children in Washington.

A central issue in the court’s McCleary decision is the unconstitutional reliance on local levies, which are neither regular nor dependable, to fund basic education. Compensation is one of the most significant areas where local dollars are backfilling inadequate state funding. According to OSPI data, between the 1987-88 and 2012-13 school years, state allocations went from covering 99% of salaries to only 77%.

As advocates for the highly capable students of Washington, we are working for full funding of the Highly Capable Program. Currently the state’s funding covers only 15% of the actual costs of the program. Districts vary widely in their ability to raise local levy funds. Districts thus vary in their ability to provide the required HC Programs. The system is not uniform and funding is not regular and dependable.

If you can’t join us in Olympia for Gifted Education Day, contact your legislators by letter, phone — the hot line is 1.800.562.6000 — or email on or about January 29th and urge them to provide ample, equitable and stable funding.

Share your personal experience as a parent or your child’s experience. Your personal story on the impact of funding inequities is a powerful way to highlight the need for a solution.

To find and contact your Legislators, use the District Finder on the Legislature’s website.

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Equity in education is an empty concept without excellence.

Washington State has too often left to chance the fate of those with exceptional academic talent rather than ensuring widespread, systematic, and appropriate opportunities to flourish.

Our state needs a commitment to both equity and excellence for all students, so that potential is never squandered.

The possibility of reaching oneʼs potential should not be met with ambivalence, indifference or depend on the ZIP code in which you reside.

• We cannot assume that our stateʼs most talented students will succeed on their own.
• We need proactive identification and development of talented youth from all demographics.
• We need to encourage intellectual ambition with an anticipation of excellence rather than simply exceeding standard.

The Legislature needs to fully fund the actual costs to districts to provide the Highly Capable Program opportunities required by the Washington Administrative Code implementing ESHB 2261, and the McCleary decision.

Join us in the Columbia Room in the Legislative Building at 9 am on March 11 to advocate with Legislators for the needs of our Highly Capable students. All Washington students are entitled to the opportunity to achieve their full potential.

OPPORTUNITY IS NOT OPTIONAL. MINDS MATTER.

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FINANCIAL STATUS OF THE COALITION

The major expense of the Coalition is the monthly retainer we pay our lobbyist. We’d like to pay her more but our yearly income won’t stretch that far.

Three questions you may ask:

(1) Why does the Coalition need a lobbyist?

Our charter says our purpose is “to foster and encourage awareness of the educational needs of highly capable/gifted students through communication and education of legislative bodies within Washington State.” In other words, we lobby the legislature.

To do this, members of the Coalition monitor the legislature’s web site and subscribe to RSS feeds to keep current on pending bills, hearings, etc. We maintain personal relationships with our own legislators. We follow political reporters for newspapers, and newsletters and web postings from other education and policy groups to keep track of what they are saying. The daily updates provided by WSSDA add much information.

But we need more than this. We need a lobbyist with experience and deep connections in Olympia to keep an eye on legislation beyond what can be gleaned from the internet; to cultivate personal relationships with supportive legislators in order to learn what they are thinking; to work with lobbyists from other education groups; to be “on the scene” for us in Olympia. Perhaps most important, she provides guidance to the Coalition in our work with legislators.

We use all this information to prepare and present testimony to legislative hearings and committee work sessions and to know when to call on advocates state wide to contact their legislators.

(2) Do we or our lobbyist treat legislators to meals or other “goodies”?

We do not spend your contributions to treat legislators to meals or other goodies. The Public Disclosure Commission and the Legislative Ethics Board will not be investigating us as they are other groups and legislators for questionable gratuities.

(3) Why do we bring this up?

Our fiscal year begins September 1 of each year. We open 2013-2014 with a balance of $1657. Our anticipated expenses for next year are $850 per month for our lobbyist; approximately $150 for rental of the Columbia Room and other expenses for Gifted Education Day; fees for filing required reports; printing and postage costs; and a membership in NEWS (the McCleary Decision people). A Treasurer’s Report is at the end of this email message. As it shows, we need income in excess of $10,500 per year in order to meet obligations and have a small carry-over balance.

While we do receive a large portion of our revenues from gifted organizations, we also rely on individual contributions from supporters around the state. Our goal continues to be to get the legislature to implement a new ample funding formula for Highly Capable Programs. Quite frankly, we struck out during the 2013 session(s). But we will be back, more energized than last year and with stronger arguments, for the 2014 session. To continue our work we need your financial support. We recommend that you make an annual contribution of at least $40.00 ~ and are happy to accept more.

Three options:

1. You can make a contribution to the Coalition with a check – use the membership form linked here.

2. We now accept donations online by credit card and PayPal. Please CLICK HERE TO DONATE on PayPal. You don’t need a PayPal account to use a credit card with them.

3. In conjunction with WAETAG and NWGCA, we continue to offer the Joint Membership. The form can be found on our membership page, on the Northwest Coalition for Gifted Education’s website at http://www.nwgca.org/donate.html, or you can go to the Washington Association of Educators of the Talented ang Gifted’s website at http://www.waetag.net/. Select Joining WAETAG.

We are often asked about employer matching funds. We are a political advocacy group, not a 501(c)(3) organization, so not all employers match contributions. Check to see if your employer will do so.

Contributions to the Coalition are not tax deductible to the contributor. The Coalition is chartered as a non-profit organization in the State of Washington and is the equivalent of a federal 501(c)(4) organization, though we have never sought federal tax status. If we show a “profit” at the end of our fiscal year, we pay tax on it as we last did in October 2011. We file a yearly tax return and do not anticipate owing taxes for 2012-2013.

We also need your cooperation when we call on you to contact your legislators on behalf of highly capable program funding and to participate in Gifted Education Day in Olympia. Our 2014 Day is February 28th. Mark your calendar now and plan to join us.

Thank you all for your generous support in previous years. We have come a long way but still have a long way to go to full implementation of Highly Capable Programs as an integral part of basic education. Our work, and yours, is not yet completed.

Here’s looking forward to a successful 2014 legislative session!

——————————————————————————
Treasurer’s Report Fiscal Year 9/1/2012 to 8/31/2013
Barbara Poyneer, Treasurer
Opening Balance
9/1/2012
$679.90
Income
Organizations
$6,180.00
Individuals
$2,181.93
Our share of Joint Memberships
$450.00
Total
$8,811.93
Funds Available
$9,491.83
Expenses
Lobbyist Retainer*
$7,650.00
Columbia Room – 1/2 of 2014 fee
$65.00
Filing Fees
$10.00
Printing & Postage
$59.66
NEWS Membership
$50.00
Total
$7.834.66
Ending Balance
8/31/2013
$1,657.17
* We prepaid Donna’s retainer for Sept., Oct., and Nov. 2012 in the 2011-12 fiscal year for federal tax purposes. Normal yearly total is $10,200.00.

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